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The building blocks of geometry

Shapeometry educational game to develop reasoning skills.

Shapes are the building blocks of geometry. Learning about shapes is a fundamental step in the basics of maths. Children need to start to understand what the properties of shape are, and how to classify shapes. Why do we need Geometry? Geometry is necessary for us to discover patterns, find areas, volumes, lengths and angles, and better understand the world around us. In the Primary school children are taught the fundamentals of geometry beginning with shapes.

Here are a few products that can enhance the learning experience.

Folding Geometric Shapes – R680.00

The Folding Geometric Shapes set includes eight three-dimensional shapes: cube, cylinder, cone, square pyramid, triangular pyramid, hexagonal prism,
rectangular prism, and triangular prism. The set is unique because it shows the shapes in a solid form as well as the net.

Number and Shape Dominoes – R375.00

This is a resource aimed at reinforcing the basic principles of early geometric shapes, and encouraging children to practice them. Number and Shape Dominoes combines an image of a 2D shape, and a basic description of the shape. For example: “is round” or “square” or “four corners and four equal sides”

ShapeOmetry – R360.00
ShapeOmetry is a fun way to help students develop key math skills and strategies. ShapeOmetry will help students develop spatial, abstract, and quantitative reasoning skills. Through hands-on play, students will build key mathematical understandings such as part-to-whole relationships, important skills that will serve them as they advance into later grades.

Fractions

Fractions can be seen as daunting to children at first. Using fun fractions games for children is a great way for to reinforce the concepts being taught. Through playing the game children have an opportunity to practice the skills being taught. The game can often show the teacher if the children are understanding the concepts being taught, or if more consolidation is necessary.

Match a Fraction Snap Game – R240.00
Match a Fraction is a simple snap game. It is a card game where half the cards have fractions images on them, and the other half have the fraction on them. Children need to find the matching fractions and win the cards.
Fraction Dominoes – R245.00

A fun twist on traditional dominoes! Reinforce Fractions by matching the image to the numeric fraction. Dominoes can be matched in 3 ways – numeric to fraction fraction to fraction or numeric to numeric.

Fraction Addition and Subtraction Bones – R550.00

Fractions can be seen as daunting to children at first. The task of adding and subtracting fractions can be even more so. If children have enough opportunity to practice working with fractions, they will become more accurate and less apprehensive. Using Fraction Addition and Subtraction Bones are an excellent resource for offering this ype of practice.

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Core Math Concepts for Every Phase

Mental Maths

I am going to highlight Learning Tools products related to the theme in age groupings – Preschool, Foundation Phase and Intermediate Phase. So, have a look at these core math concepts for every phase.

Preschool: Counting Hands Classroom Kit

Counting Hands is a versatile product that can be used at different developmental levels, and to practice many different skills. Sort, graph, sequence and make patterns with fun counting hands. Use the hand buttons and laminated activity cards to explore addition, subtraction and data collection.

Foundation Phase: Under the Sea Shells

Bring word problems to life (and make them concrete) with clamshells and fun little crab and sea star counters in the Under the Sea Shells game. This is the perfect way to practice addition, subtraction, and finding the missing number. The game includes 40 double-sided word problem cards (80 word problems), 4 clamshells, and 80 counters.

Intermediate Phase: Snap It Up

Snap It Up is a fun, fast paced addition and subtraction game. This game helps children improve their mental math ability. Mental math not only stimulates your mind, but it also helps one get a better “number sense.” In other words one becomes more familiar with how numbers interact. This is very important, because as you know, math is something that builds on itself. If you don’t have a good grasp on how numbers interact, then more complicated math will seem like more of a challenge.

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Math Games

Math games like Tri-Facta help kids deepen their mathematical understanding and reasoning.

Math games should form an essential part of any child’s learning. By playing various math games children have the opportunity to explore fundamental number concepts, such as the counting sequence, one-to-one correspondence, and computation strategies. Math games can also encourage children to explore number combinations, place value, patterns, and other important mathematical concepts. Playing games give learners the chance to deepen their mathematical understanding and reasoning.
Below are a few of the my favourite math games:

Scaredy Cat

Scaredy Cat is a fun counting game. The object of the game is to collect the most bird pieces before the scarecrow is completed. Players collect and count the bird cards before Scaredy Cat appears. When the scarecrow is complete, the player with the most birds wins.

Mini Muffin Match Up

This early maths development game encourages colour recognition, matching, sorting, and counting. Children develop fine motor skills as they use Squeezy Tweezers to pick up the muffin counters.

BrainBox: My First Maths

Designed for parents and teachers to play with younger children, this “brain box” will help improve visual perception, observation and memory skills as well as reinforce early maths concepts. There is also BrainBox Maths for the older child.

Pop to the Shops

Help children learn about handling money and giving change, by playing this fun shopping game. Move from shop to shop, using play money to buy lots of different items. The currency is cents – so it’s a perfect game for our South African children.

Snap It Up for Addition and Subtraction

Snap It Up is a fun, fast paced Addition and Subtraction Game. This game helps children improve their mental maths ability. The object of this addition and subtraction game is to be the first player to make three correct addition and subtraction equations. There is also Snap It Up Multiplication and Division for the older child.

Tri-Facta for Multiplication and Division

Tri-FACTa is a fun and educational math game that helps your school aged child practice multiplication and division facts while having fun. This math game is excellent for the classroom and for the home environment. This version is for multiplication and division. There is also Tri-FACTa for Addition and Subtraction for the younger child.

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Understanding Numbers and Time

Place value dice

Understanding numbers and time is not always easy for children. Here are some great products to develop their sense of numbers and time.

Place Value Dice

Place value is the value given to the place or position of a digit in a number. Children need to understand the relationship between each digit in a number. The Place Value dice helps to support developing children’s number sense and their understanding of place value.

Time Bones

This is an excellent product for Grade 2 and 3s. Time Bones are aimed to encourage children to recognise, practice and understand various forms of time.

Equivalence Bones

Another Senior Primary product, and an excellent addition to the My Fraction range. Decimals, fractions and percentages are just different ways of showing the same value. Children need to learn how to manipulate this information, and show their understanding by converting a percentage to a decimal, or a fraction into a percentage. Equivalence Bones is an excellent resource to encourage this.

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The Magic of Base 10

Base 10 Starter Set

Our everyday number system is a Base 10 system. The Base 10 system is known as the decimal system. In this system there are 10 digits to show all numbers. These are 0,1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9. Numbers are made up of these digits in the same way that words are made up of letters. These words are called place value headings. For example: the number 325 is made up of: five ones; two tens; and three hundreds.

The Base 10 system seems logical, or even “natural” to us adults as we have used it our whole life. It seems as if nearly ever civilisation before us had used it too, more than likely because we have 10 fingers and 10 toes. However, for children, trying to get their heads around this system is difficult at first.

This is where the Base 10 blocks come in. Base 10 blocks are a concrete representation of our decimal system. The block set consists of a unit block ­ that is the smallest of all the blocks, and represents the units. There is then a rod or 10 block that is a string of 10 unit blocks stuck together to represent the tens. Then there is a flat or 100 block, which is 10 rods stuck together to represent 100. In some sets you may also get a 1000 block that corresponds to a 1000 units.

Learners then manipulate the Base 10 block set to represent all numbers. This physically shows them how the number is comprised of units, tens, hundreds and even thousands. It physically shows them the place value of each of the digits making up the number. The base 10 Block can be used in all phases of learners’ education. In the early years the Base 10 blocks are ideal for representing numbers, addition and subtraction of numbers and basic mathematical principals. As the learners advance in their education, so the Base 10 blocks can be used to assist with fractions, decimals and other more complicated mathematical concept.

Base 10 blocks are a must have in the classroom.

Click here for full product description.

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Fractions Bundle

Fraction Tower Cubes

Learning Tools is selling a Fractions Educational Games Bundle on Groupon for R899 Including Delivery (18% Off) . The bundle includes three games that kids can use to learn about fractions from an early age:

Fraction Tower Cubes
Colour coded cubes are marked with respective fractions that cover One whole, 1/2, 1/3, 1/4, 1/5, 1/6, 1/8, 1/10 and 1/12. This game offers an engaging, hands-on way to reinforce fractions at home and in the classroom. Essentially helps children see visually what a fraction is, and how different-sized fractions relate to one another.

Rainbow Fraction Dominoes
This game offers a fun twist on traditional dominoes and features numeric and visual fraction representations. Dominoes can be matched in three ways – numeric to fraction fraction to fraction or numeric to numeric

Fraction Addition and Subtraction Bones
Each bone has a “slider” that can be moved to conceal part of the maths sentence. Children need to calculate which part of the maths sentence has been concealed. The product offers children practical ways in which to engage in the area of learning being presented by the teacher.

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The Magic of Base 10 block sets

Base 10 Starter Kit

Base 10 blocks

Our everyday number system is a Base 10 system. The Base 10 system is known as the decimal system.
In this system there are 10 digits to show all numbers. These are 0,1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9. Numbers are made up of these digits in the same way that words are made up of letters. These words are called place value headings. For example: the number 325 is made up of: five ones; two tens; and three hundreds.

The Base 10 system seems logical, or even “natural” to us adults as we have used it our whole life. It seems as if nearly ever civilisation before us had used it too. More than likely because we have 10 fingers and 10 toes. But for children, trying to get their heads around this system is difficult at first.

This is where the Base 10 blocks come in. Base 10 blocks are a concrete representation of our decimal system. The block set consists of a “unit block” – which is the smallest of all the blocks, and represents the units. There is then a “rod” or “10 block” that is a string of 10 unit blocks stuck together to represent the tens. Then there is a “flat” or “100 block” which is 10 rods stuck together to represent 100. In some sets you may also get a “1000 block” that corresponds to a 1000 units.

This is the “1-block” or “unit block” the smallest of all the blocks.
This is the “10-block” corresponding to 10 units. It is also referred to as a”rod” or long.
This is the “100-block” and corresponds to 100 units. It is also called a “flat”.
This is the “1000-block” and corresponds to 1000 units. It is also called a “cube”

Learners then manipulate the Base 10 block set to represent all numbers. This physically shows them how the number is comprised of units, tens, hundreds and even thousands. It physically shows them the place value of each of the digits making up the number.

The base 10 blocks can be used in all phases of learner’s education. In the early years the Base 10 blocks are ideal for representing numbers, addition and subtraction of numbers and basic mathematical principals. As the learners advance in their education, so the Base 10 blocks can be used to assist with fractions, decimals and other more complicated mathematical concept.

Base 10 blocks are a “Must Have” in the classroom!

Base 10 block sets can be purchased through Learning Tools in 3 sizes:

1. Base 10 Smart Pack – R100.00

Base Ten Smartpack


Perfect for individual use, or small groups. The set consists of 121 (1 flat, 20 rods, and 100 units) comes in a reseal-able bag

2. Base 10 Starter Kit – R735.00

Base Ten Starter Set (Interlocking)


Great for larger groups, small groups or individual exploration. Boxed set features 100 units, 30 rods, 10 flats, 1 cubes and 112-page Base Ten Book filled with clever teaching ideas

3. Base 10 Classroom Kit – R1900.00

Base Ten Classroom Set


This set is ideal for whole class participation. Boxed set features 600 units, 200 rods, 20 flats, 3 cubes and 112-page Base Ten Book filled with clever teaching ideas.